Well That Sure Blew My Aspie Mind!


I was on my way to school the other morning, walking along, not paying attention, just staring at the ground.  Typical.  Then, something caught my attention.  I saw something move out of the corner of my right eye.  I looked up, and it was a little hand.

That little hand was attached to a little girl.  I am terrible at guessing any human being’s age.  However, if I had to hazard for this tiny one? I would say she was about nine? Maybe 10?

Her little hand was waving back and forth.  My gaze travelled up from it, along her arm, and to her face.  I was then greeted by a huge grin.  I was stunned.  Partially because I wasn’t fully awake yet, but also because I wasn’t prepared for such a surprising, social gesture!

I looked into her eyes briefly, made a small wave back, and offered her probably one of my most crooked Aspie “smiles,” ever! *laughing*  She didn’t seem to care, though.  No.  She continued, bouncing on her way, heading off to school–just like me.

I paused and wondered if she did this all the time.  Or was it just that one day? Just that one morning? Regardless, I couldn’t get the entire image of her, the scenario, out of my mind for my entire commute! As I replayed everything, my Aspie “smile” spread out a bit, and became much less “crooked.” *laughs again*

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  1. Little kids always amaze me with how carefree and welcoming they are. I wasn’t when I was that age, I was painfully shy except in my closest circles. I guess it was one of the first hints, lol.

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  2. Hi bittercupgonemad. Good to see you, and welcome. Although, I know we spoke via your blog, so “welcome,” as this is your first comment, I believe. *grins*

    I agree with you about kids. They seem to me (in a way), almost like a blank tablet. They do not have all of the views, notions, beliefs and such, that we do, as adults. This is actually true. Even scientifically when quite young, their brains have not fully developed. They can only learn in certain ways. Moving on, they do absorb information in yet a different manner, before they reach adulthood, as well.

    By no means does this indicate that they are not intelligent, though! Far from it! In fact, I tend to think that so many children are smarter than us! Make no mistake. They take in everything we adults do, say–even what we don’t say! That is why it drives me nuts when people “talk down” to kids. The best way to treat them, is to communicate with them is in a mature manner.

    Sorry, tangential slightly? That would be me!

    I, too, was so shy! Unbelievably sensitive, as well. That was my “tablet?” Also, like you, highly prophetic of things to come?

    Take care,
    PA

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  3. iz awesome, the power of a smile, no? And unconditional acceptance, by a child or a pet (not your own), even as a sudden surprise, has to make you feel good about yourself, regardless of anything else. I happy for you, and this experience, and that it re-lived positively throughout your day.

    (My moms dog sent me a ‘cheer-up’ card the other day, *ahem* ‘anonymously’, that had me giggling for 5 minutes when i opened and read it – apparently, it was to “mY beSt FrenD”, but i had to “ges hoo?” it was from – i need to tell him the “arf Arf arf” gave it away, lol! :D)

    And shyness is sometimes also an indicator of reasonable distrust – i believe kids (and animals) do sense things, and are good judges of character, at least on their level – and ‘us’, having some of the conditions we do, would maybe (instinctively?) use it to protect ourselves from ‘insincere’ (and/or overwhelming) social situations. Thoughts?

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  4. Hi Arkay. The power of a smile as awesome? Well, for me, that is debatable. In terms of having Asperger’s, it may not be so “awesome,” at all. I’m not sure how to explain, or describe it. Let me think. And even so, I still may not be able to convey it properly!

    I suppose if it were from a person I knew, and was close to, it would be awesome. From a stranger, it would depend upon context? Like this situation. This situation was good.

    From another stranger, it would (or could), have no meaning or impact at all. Or, that smile from a stranger could cause me anxiety, discomfort, sympathy/empathy…again, context. It all has to do with the interpretation of social cues, and having Asperger’s.

    Thank you about the positive aspects regarding the experience, though. Funnily enough, I saw the same girl today, when we were both heading off to school again! Although, this time, she was in the company of her father, and younger brother. There was no wave and smile, but she did look up and acknowledge me.

    Great about the card. I have seen such ones before, and they are amusing. If I were to send something, I would write a “letter,” from the animal! You know me, though. How my mind works? *laughing*

    Shyness an indicator of reasonable distrust. Interesting. I think that may apply on the “adult level?” That is why we, as adults, hold back. Now, would a shy child have that “intuitive,” mode of feeling? Yes, perhaps, so. And I say that as “intuitive,” as I am making reference to the “blank tablet,” I mentioned, above.

    I would tend to think that we would “use” our “shyness” (you stated “instinctively”) as adults. That is because it has been learned over time. I chose the word “intuitively,” for children. It has not been learned. Or at least, perhaps, not to the degree of an adult level.

    We “use” it as adults, to put up barriers. Children may simply have it as a resource to navigate their world; to learn and grow. That doesn’t negate a form of protection from overwhelming situations, it’s just…different?

    Does that make any sense? I’m not sure!

    I will definitely stick with the word: instinct. Again, going back to the notion of development etc… I think I’ve repeated that enough times, and how children are not even “super-” sensitive, but even “supra-” sensitive! I believe the latter fits even better linguistically? Ah, maybe I’m just making up words, as always… *winks*

    So, there are my thoughts as you asked for them. Now, bouncing the ball back, if you wish?

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  5. I calculate tons of number analysis for these types of games because I think that the past can give us an insight of what can happen in the future. As you may or may not know it may be impossible to decipher the winning team in the NFL. This is the main reason why I recommend using trends for football.

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  6. Hi Trey Grizzlies. I apologize for not responding sooner, but if you’ve been reading lately, you’ll hopefully understand. I feel like I have to keep saying that to everyone–and well, I guess I will.

    You know, I forgot what this post was about entirely when I read your response in my Inbox. I was, ‘What is this guy talkin’ about? I don’t DO math!’ That last part is a bit of a joke.

    I have something called Dyscalculia. It’s a learning disorder re: math and my degree of it is bad. Still, I like your idea. Maybe I could still try it out somehow. If you come back, maybe you could give me some examples?

    Take care,
    PA

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